Browsing: somatic psychology

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Vacillating between emotional pain and the somatic relief of psychic numbing, Marie came to my office bewildered and in shock. Two weeks earlier a truck had crashed into a car in which Marie’s mother was riding. Although the truck driver had survived, Marie’s mother and her partner had instantly died.

“I don’t know how you can help,” Marie said, her tired eyes revealing her grief. “You can’t bring my mother back or help me make sense of my loss. I’ve always had faith in a divine spirit, in an afterlife, but now nothing seems right.”

Given the traumatic impact of Marie’s loss, how could I help?

Therapeutic Encounters

Hopefully, with good work and practice, with learning ‘on the job’, with learning from one’s mistakes, and by doing some ‘outcome’ studies or research, and thus getting useful feed-back from our clients, our peers, our supervisors, our mentors, etc., we will improve our skill-set. Working in different places, under different conditions, with different client groups, and with people from different cultures, we are able to hone our basic training, natural abilities, our skills: this is the ‘craft’ component of our work. We can only get better by doing more.

Currents

In 2014, the EABP Science & Research Committee (SRC) established a set of simple ‘Guidelines’ for BP/SP Case Studies. We are now engaged in collecting a number of possible contributions for a soon-to-be published book on “Body Psychotherapy Case Studies” (at end 2017 / early 2018). This is part of the SRC remit to help to try and establish a reasonably good ‘scientific’ basis for Body Psychotherapy; and to increase awareness of different types of valid research – case studies being one of these; and to increase awareness of different ways of working in the field of Body Psychotherapy / Somatic Psychology; and we are intending to use some of the ‘project’ money in our SRC budget for this purpose. We would like to invite you to help us in this project. We hope that a reasonable percentage of you will respond.

Reviews

Turow begins her book by introducing mindfulness. Turow thoroughly goes over each aspect of mindfulness, explaining everything from its core concepts to the proper time and setting for practices. Included is ‘Resolving misconceptions and overcoming stumbling blocks’ to encourage further practice and ability, but perhaps the most significant portions of this chapter are the parts of “Special Considerations for Practicing Mindfulness After Trauma” and “Choosing a Specific Practice.” The parts begin a trend that moves throughout the book, encouraging careful and safe practice for survivors especially and consideration that not all practices work for everyone; indeed, she has her reader explore specially for themselves, rather than a prescribed program.

Currents

How do you integrate scientific knowledge, training and application into your clinical work? What advice do you have as practitioners approach the diversity in trainings to learn ways to craft their own? We want to hear and share your thoughts with our readers. Deadline for submissions is ongoing, final acceptance date is June 1, 2017.

Currents

In spite of the best intentions, parents tend to repeat the same injuries with their children that they themselves experienced in childhood. When conflicts arise, they are usually tender spots from childhood that resurface. These baffling interactions may happen over and over because their underlying themes are elusive. This workshop is reparative–we will address healing current emotional wounds within and between family members, supporting parents to raise children who have a better foundation for emotional health than they may have received.

Therapeutic Encounters

The goal of Flow of Leadership is to make more choices available for ourselves in those situations where implicit memories bypass our conscious mind, causing us to act or respond in ways that produce havoc and disconnect. Situations where when we look back, we feel like our survival was threatened, and if we have enough objectivity we are left wondering “What the heck happened? Why did I do that?”

Reviews

Ardea writes with bodily expression, with movement in color, in text, in breath: “My pelvis feels inflamed, wobbly, twisted. It’s heavy like an overloaded water balloon. When I breathe and pay attention to my pelvis, I feel sadness well up, as though there’s an artesian well bursting up from my lower abdomen to fill my heart with sad, sad, waters. My hands feel prickly as all these waters overflow from my heart. They gust out in shaky waves down my arms and hands”.