Browsing: Elya Steinberg

Currents

Maintaining our traditional summer focus, we are pleased to share reviews of books “hot off the press”, author reflections on their writing experience, and articles from our regular contributors. As a courtesy to our subscribers, we will email a special link to access the complete PDF. And, make sure we don’t leave anyone out, we’re also posting each review, reflection and article individually over the next several weeks.

Somatic Psychology

Biodynamic massage is an integral part of biodynamic psychotherapy, which allows psychotherapeutic work within the framework of the body. The name ‘biodynamic massage’ encompasses fourteen different methods of touch. Almost all the touch methods can be performed at different levels of the body.

A biodynamic psychotherapist is often guided by a stethoscope (either electronic or ordinary) stethscoprewhilst carrying out biodynamic massage (Southwell, unpublished; Stauffer, 2005, unpublished, 2010; van Heel, 2014); the stethoscope is utilized for listening to the digestive system’s sounds (also known in this context as the psycho-peristalsis) (Boyesen, M-L. & Boyesen, G. 1978). This makes it possible to obtain immediate feedback from the body about the level of accuracy, quality, and attunement of the touch applied. The experience of touch must be modulated by context and internal state (Ellingsen et al., 2016).

Currents

Fall often signifies a time of transition as well as a time of return. Summer’s blazing colors transition to softer crimsons, scarlets, golds. Temperatures soften leaving a slight chill in the air and holidays wrap up as we return to school and work.

In our Fall issue, we’re pleased to announce the return of Galit Serebrenick-Hai as she writes about addition, memory, trauma and somatic psychotherapy, Amber Gray, who shares her integration of Continuum Movement, somatic psychotherapy and trauma work, Ronan M. Kisch who writes about what he calls the Six Pulse Points of Well-Being, and Shlomit Eliashar, now joined by Yael Shahar, who write about psycho-peristalsis in the shared body.

SPT Magazine honors our newest contributor, Dr. Elya Steinberg, as she shares a two-part series exploring transformative moments in the Biodynamic psychotherapy room. And we offer a special memoir written by the late Dr. Eleanor Hamilton about her experiences with Wilhelm Reich. We offer many thanks to Alice L. Ladas (author of The G-Spot) for granting SPT Magazine the rights to publish this remarkable piece.

Somatic Psychology

She says, “If only I could say everything I want”, and tells us that lately she has begun writing a diary, despite her inner struggles. When she talks about her writing she diverges and tells how sometimes a style of writing can change and turn the most secret thoughts in her diary into what she calls “real writing”, and gradually the energy in the room changes and we all feel that we are marching “into the real” with her. From the universal pain that pounds the room sprout new buds, her pale face becomes pink once again; her hands that previously froze over her mouth awaken and begin to move seemingly of their own accord in excitement, in order to add additional dimensions to the pouring words. Her body straightens up and starts swaying to the rhythm of her words, and she no longer needs support for her back, which was previously aching, and it seems that the strength of her vitality serves her and is like an internal support invisible to the naked eye, enabling her to sit straight and at the same to develop new dimensions. Gottfried, my co-facilitator for the group “Attending to the Silence” says, “Look how the energy in the room has changed”. And this new recognition in transformation beyond the old standpoints is molded; another option beyond the painful dynamics of victim-aggressor-collaborator.