Browsing: EABP

Currents

Maintaining our traditional summer focus, we are pleased to share reviews of books “hot off the press”, author reflections on their writing experience, and articles from our regular contributors. As a courtesy to our subscribers, we will email a special link to access the complete PDF. And, make sure we don’t leave anyone out, we’re also posting each review, reflection and article individually over the next several weeks.

Therapeutic Encounters

Hopefully, with good work and practice, with learning ‘on the job’, with learning from one’s mistakes, and by doing some ‘outcome’ studies or research, and thus getting useful feed-back from our clients, our peers, our supervisors, our mentors, etc., we will improve our skill-set. Working in different places, under different conditions, with different client groups, and with people from different cultures, we are able to hone our basic training, natural abilities, our skills: this is the ‘craft’ component of our work. We can only get better by doing more.

Currents

In 2014, the EABP Science & Research Committee (SRC) established a set of simple ‘Guidelines’ for BP/SP Case Studies. We are now engaged in collecting a number of possible contributions for a soon-to-be published book on “Body Psychotherapy Case Studies” (at end 2017 / early 2018). This is part of the SRC remit to help to try and establish a reasonably good ‘scientific’ basis for Body Psychotherapy; and to increase awareness of different types of valid research – case studies being one of these; and to increase awareness of different ways of working in the field of Body Psychotherapy / Somatic Psychology; and we are intending to use some of the ‘project’ money in our SRC budget for this purpose. We would like to invite you to help us in this project. We hope that a reasonable percentage of you will respond.

Currents

The International Body Psychotherapy Journal announces the publication of its Lisbon Congress Supplement. Articles from keynotes speakers are offered to add insight into and generate conversation about body psychotherapy.

Nancy Eichhorn offers her experience listening to six speakers’ viewpoints at the day long celebration honoring The Handbook of Body Psychotherapy and Somatic Psychology in a four-part blog posting with some longer writings and some short eclipses of the content shared. As well, she hopes to reflect their collective themes that resonated with William Cornell’s call for institutions to train ‘embodied’ psychotherapists rather than body psychotherapists—a play on the aliveness of the adjective rather than the solid structural nature of a noun.