Browsing: Dr Elya Steinberg

Currents

During the workshop, she will begin by looking at some key scientific aspects of the neurobiology of touch and how they relate to the diverse uses of touch in Biodynamic psychology. Scientific findings
underpin our understanding of the use of touch clinically. She will explore an updated understanding of the place of touch in the therapeutic encounter, referencing current research on the neuroscience of touch, affective touch, attachment, and trauma using clinical examples and integrated experiential work.

She will pay attention to the phenomena of embodied transference, countertransference, resonance and interference (Boadella, 1981) whilst negotiating the dilemma: to touch or not to touch, and, if to touch, how to touch. Exploring how we as psychotherapists can “hold the possibility of touch, as it can be both an appropriate or inappropriate therapeutic intervention” (Asheri, 2009 page 108).

Therapeutic Encounters

As a second-generation Holocaust survivor, Dr. Elya Steinberg was not in the Holocaust. She was the victim of her own parents and not the Nazis, parents who did not undergo psychotherapy and therefore transmitted the trauma to her, as many Holocaust survivors did to their children when they were unable to process the horrible atrocity. They did not have enough help from mental health professionals who were also unable to process these horrible stories.

Currents

Fall often signifies a time of transition as well as a time of return. Summer’s blazing colors transition to softer crimsons, scarlets, golds. Temperatures soften leaving a slight chill in the air and holidays wrap up as we return to school and work.

In our Fall issue, we’re pleased to announce the return of Galit Serebrenick-Hai as she writes about addition, memory, trauma and somatic psychotherapy, Amber Gray, who shares her integration of Continuum Movement, somatic psychotherapy and trauma work, Ronan M. Kisch who writes about what he calls the Six Pulse Points of Well-Being, and Shlomit Eliashar, now joined by Yael Shahar, who write about psycho-peristalsis in the shared body.

SPT Magazine honors our newest contributor, Dr. Elya Steinberg, as she shares a two-part series exploring transformative moments in the Biodynamic psychotherapy room. And we offer a special memoir written by the late Dr. Eleanor Hamilton about her experiences with Wilhelm Reich. We offer many thanks to Alice L. Ladas (author of The G-Spot) for granting SPT Magazine the rights to publish this remarkable piece.

Somatic Psychology

What if you were guided in real-time not only through technique but also via feedback from the client’s autonomous nervous system—objective feedback from the client’s body, as well as what the client volunteers about his/her body and intuition during your therapy sessions?

Sound mechanistic? Perhaps too medically invasive?

In truth, it is possible to humanly obtain immediate feedback from the body, using a stethoscope (an electronic or ordinary one) to listen to the clients’ digestive system’s sounds, the psychoperistalsis. The sounds we hear reveal intriguing information about the level of accuracy, quality, and attunement of the touch we’re applying.