Browsing: birth psychology

Currents

We are pleased to share information regarding APPPAH;s 20th International Congress in the beautiful city of San Diego, California, November 30-December 3, 2017!

Along with a wonderful line-up of impressive Key Note Speakers and Breakout Speakers, they have now announced their selection of Pre and Post Congress Workshops. These will be taking place on Thursday, November 30 before the Congress and on Sunday, December 3, following the Congress.

You can register for your Pre-Congress Workshop and Post-Congress Workshop by clicking on the each of the links listed below. The Birth Psychology Congress website also has more detailed information on all of the presentations, who the presenters are and what you can expect to learn during the workshop. The full day (8 hour CE credits) Pre-Congress Workshop is $100, and the half day (4 hour CE credits) Post-Congress Workshop is $50.
If you have any questions you can reach out to us by emailing: registration@birthpsychology.com

Birth Psychology

Babies and children can often be our greatest teachers in life. They remind us of our deep human connection to each other and to the world. An Integrative Approach to Treating Babies and Children, edited by John Wilks, persuades us to listen to everyone’s own “baby history.”

In other words, Wilks has us look into the history of our birth in order to have a greater understanding of its effects on our adult life. Wilks suggests in the introduction that, “One of the major themes in this book is that it is much more important for us to create the right space in ourselves and in our clinic setting to work with babies rather than what we ‘do’ to a baby” (16).

Currents

It is a pleasure and a privilege to welcome you to the APPPAH 20th International Congress! Our Congress Chair, Co-Chair, and Committee are looking forward to hosting this special event at the beautiful Town and Country Resort and Convention Center in sunny San Diego, California. We are beyond ecstatic to have you!

New times require new leaders, capable of bringing increased creativity and awareness to their work with the knowledge and skills required to be agents of positive change. In periods of significant scientific, psychological, and social transformation, old paradigms begin to erode, and new ways of thinking, leading, and interacting spring into action. The APPPAH 20th International Congress is designed to spotlight these new discoveries and open windows into ways of thinking appropriate for an interconnected pre- and perinatal global learning environment.

Currents

Authors Amika Dharmadhikari, Gajanan Kelkar, and Avinash Dharmadhikari of the Manashakti Institute in India generated discussion among the JOPPPAH editorial staff. It is the usual journal policy to publish only articles with unanimous support of the editorial team. Three of the four editorial team members found this article to meet the journal’s quality standards for clinical contributions and valued its potential to add a unique cultural perspective. However, our Associate Editor, Dr. Thomas R Verny, dissented on this article over concerns that it did not contribute new insights and that it was not scientifically sound. He also expressed concern about the potential mixing of religion and science. However, since this is rather common in work from India, the rest of the team felt the article merited attention as it does present another cultural perspective that includes recognition of the soul in clinical approaches.

Birth Psychology

Pregnancy and birth truly matter. Research has shown that the internal states of a mother influence the life of the baby inside her, especially those created by chronic stress and overwhelming events. Caring for a baby inside the mother means more than proper nutrition; it involves helping the mother and her partner connect with the baby, and determining what supports that mother, in particular. Every baby needs two layers of support; for the inside baby, the mother is her world.

Currents

In Utero is intended to help prevent some of the negative imprints and trauma that ensue through personal and professional ignorance. It does not delve into the known and applied modalities for addressing and healing trauma that occurs between conception and birth. It is essential for all of us to understand that, yes, we want to focus on the importance of this primal or primary period, and, if that time was not ideal, it does not have to be a life sentence. Current research is demonstrating that healing can occur at any time.

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It is no longer acceptable for the more than 20 organizations dedicated to pre and perinatal life to operate as singular entities. We must band together and collaborate, we must aggregate our collective power to change the behaviors of the medical maternity community. If we are to successfully move the needle from traumatic birth – as a daily practice of U.S. hospitals – to a peaceful birth culture, we must form a unified front.

Therapeutic Encounters

Our kinesthetic sense is the sense that tells you all you need to know about space: the space inside your body, the space around you and spatial relationships. It’s key to a body-oriented intelligence and, aptly, considered by many synonymous with extra sensory perception and intuition. Introducing a pregnant woman to feeling space, body breathing, and positive messaging is an effective way to wake up and empower her kinesthetic sense. And, trusting this inner-outer sense of space is essential for the pre and perinatal journey.

Reflections

“Face-to-face communication is very fast, both in adults and mothers and infants,” Beebe says. “When we watch people interacting in real time, we often do not see subtle aspects of the interaction. When we slow it down, and view it second by second, or by fractions of seconds, we see a new subterranean world of the details of interactions. Viewing the film frame-by-frame is like having a social microscope. You can see how each person affects the other, moment by moment. You can see who acted first- did the infant turn his head away first, and then the mother moved her head in close, looming in? Or did the mother loom in first, and then the infant turned his head away?” .